Australia – Driving

Australian traffic rules to remember:

If you’re driving slowly – getting used to the traffic, y’know – the lane for you is the leftmost lane if there is more than one lane in the direction you’re going.

If you’re traveling on a highway or freeway, Australian traffic rules say you should stay on the left lane (or one of the left lanes if there are more than two lanes going in the one direction) unless you’re overtaking. There would be signs to remind you of this.

If you’re entering and crossing an intersection, drivers customarily defer to the motorist on the right unless he or she is stopped by a STOP or YIELD sign. At a T intersection, the motorist driving straight through has the right of way.

Don’t beep your horn – unless you’re in a situation where you need to warn another driver, for instance, when he’s about to hit you.

The speed limit in a built-up residential area has for a long time been 60 kilometers per hour (35mph), but this has been reduced in many places to 50 kilometers per hour as in the Brisbane suburbs and a number of Sydney areas. Other cities may have adopted the lower limit as well. Be watchful of posted speed limits and do check with the locals. On country roads and highways the usual speed limit has been 100km/hr (62mph) or 110km/hr (68mph), particularly on freeways, unless signs indicate another speed limit. Already, the speed limit on certain stretches of the Newcastle Highway and on Sydney’s M4 freeway has been reduced.

Some road signs to take note of:

NO STANDING. Well, sure, you can’t be standing while driving a car. What it means is you can’t stop in the area indicated except to let a passenger get in or off a vehicle, and you certainly can’t park there.

NO STOPPING. Except in the event of medical emergencies, don’t stop in the area indicated.

NO PARKING. Just what it means. You can unload and unload passengers but shouldn’t leave your vehicle parked there.

BUS ZONE. Well, leave that to the buses. Taxi zone. Ditto for taxis.

LOADING AND UNLOADING ZONE. If you’re driving a truck, ute, van or wagon, you’re allowed to park here if you’re delivering or picking up some sort of cargo. If you’re driving a passenger car, you may have to explain what you’re loading or unloading.

The Sydney Harbor Bridge, the Sydney Harbor Tunnel, and some of the highways and roads are toll ways, so have change ready to go through the tollgates quickly. A growing number of cars are fitted with transponders which allow these vehicles to drive through specially marked gates without stopping. An encoded magnetic card has also been available for some toll ways. On some toll ways, only transponders called e-Tags (and temporary e-Way passes) can be used.

Driving in Australia:

If you’re a visitor and hold a valid driver’s license (in English) from your own country, fine, you’re allowed to drive throughout all of Australia. (But an international driver’s license, if you have one, does not by itself give you the right to drive in Australia.)

If your driver’s licence is not in English, a translation may be necessary and you may also need to have an international driver’s license.

If you come from a country where motorists drive on the left-hand side of the road, there’s not much more to know, and you should easily adjust to driving in Australia by following local driving customs and laws.

If you come from the US, or from another country where people drive on the right-hand side of the road, there’ll be a bit to get used to, the main thing being that you drive on the left-hand side of the road in Australia; and that if you turn left or right, you must remember to go, as you complete your turn, into the left-hand side of the road you are turning into, instead of to the right as you’re used to.

Parking

When driving in Australia, it is important to park properly to avoid getting a ticket.

You can park off-street where no NO STANDING, NO PARKING, or other restrictions apply.

You can park at car parks or parking stations, usually at an hourly rate.

You can park where there are parking meters so long as you feed them with the right money (have $2 and $1 coins handy) and don’t overstay.

Roundabouts:

Traffic in a roundabout flows in a clockwise direction.

In a two-lane roundabout, you keep to the left lane if you’re turning left or going straight ahead.

You keep to the right lane if you’re turning right. You can also use the right lane in a two-lane roundabout if you’re going straight ahead.

You use your left-turn signal for a left turn, the right-turn signal for a right turn. If you’re turning right and are on the right lane, switch on your left-turn signal when exiting. It has become law in New South Wales that motorists must signal left, in every instance, whenever exiting from a roundabout.

If you plan to drive in Melbourne, watch out for the “hook turn” signs – and be prepared to turn right from the leftmost lane.

Weird? Some drivers think so, and some go out of their way to avoid Melbourne streets with marked hook turns.

If you’re new to hook turns, yes, it can be both confusing and exasperating, and you’re also likely to miss your turn if you’re caught in the wrong lane.

Confused?… Doing the hook:

Once you need to turn right and you see the hook turn sign, move as quickly as you can to the leftmost lane.

On the green light, move forward on this lane to a point where you can turn right into the correct lane on the road you wish to enter.

At this point, you’re blocking traffic from the left. But that’s all right because they’re stopped on the red light.

When this red light turns green, turn right quickly into the street you want to go. The stopped traffic that was earlier on your left then follows you on the green light.

Australia Tourism – Coastal

Find out more about Australia’s 50,000 kilometers of spellbinding coastline.

Wherever you find them, our white, sandy beaches are just as you imagine – uncrowded, unspoilt and utterly enticing. You can marvel at World Heritage-listed wonders, chill out at a beach retreat or just enjoy fish and chips on the shore. However you experience our coastline, the crashing waves and gentle sea breeze are all part of a lifestyle that you won’t want to leave behind.

New South Wales: Byron Bay

You’ll love our new age paradise, famous for glorious surfing beaches and a lifestyle that combines hippy chic with hedonistic fun. Here you can learn to surf with local experts, take a sunrise walk along Cape Byron Walking Track, get your gear off on the nudist-friendly Kings Beach or ride the wild surf at The Pass. That’s in between drinking lattes, analyzing your aura and getting your palm read of course.

Queensland: Whitsundays

You can’t miss the Whitsundays – 74 pristine, palm-fringed islands tucked inside the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. Amongst the white sand and warm, aquamarine waters you can meet marine life, see rainbow-colored coral, tussle with game fish, set sail, party hard or snooze next to the sea. With only eight islands inhabited, you’re sure to find one where only your footprints touch the sand.

Queensland: Gold Coast

This iconic holiday destination offers 70 kilometers of sun-drenched beaches, World Heritage-listed rainforests, theme parks and non-stop shopping and nightlife. Meet dolphins and polar bears at theme parks, ride rolling surf or do a day trip to an island. Party all night then explore the lush, subtropical hinterland. On Australia’s ‘coast with the most’ life is all about having fun.

Victoria: Mornington Peninsula

Discover top swimming and surfing beaches, historic bayside villages and million-dollar views on this picturesque peninsula on Port Phillip Bay just an hour south of Melbourne. Trek the rugged coastline past dunes, beaches, cliffs and lighthouses. Then spot koalas on French Island, swim with dolphins and seals at Sorrento and stop for lunch at vineyards or olive groves overlooking the sea.

Tasmania: Wineglass Bay

You can enjoy pristine beaches all to yourself on the stunning Freycinet Peninsula. The most famous is Wineglass Bay, a perfect curve of white sand and turquoise sea against pink and grey granite peaks. Take in the magical view after an easy climb from Coles Bay or challenging trek from the top of Mount Amos. Or connect to this coastal paradise by going sea kayaking, swimming and scuba diving.

Western Australia: Margaret River

This famous wine growing region is also a natural paradise of surf beaches, tall karri forests, underground caves and bush tracks. The wonderful wine and food of the vineyards meet world-class waves on the 75 beaches. Swim in the crystal-clear waters of Bunker Bay, ride the crashing surf of Surfers Point, and watch whales and explore caves at Cape Leeuwin. Margaret River is a place where breathtaking scenery and good living meld into one.

South Australia: Fleurieu Peninsula

Dive or snorkel dramatic shipwrecks and marine life, visit famous vineyards or hit the surf in this coastal playground, just an hour’s drive south of Adelaide. Stay in cute coastal hamlets Port Noarlunga and Victor Harbor or the historic river town of Goolwa. Take a dip in perfect Horseshoe Bay, windsurf at Sellicks Beach or dive at Rapid Bay. See ancient forests and visit local wineries. Walk across spectacular headlands and get up close to native wildlife. No wonder they say this coat hanger-shaped strip has it all.

Australia – Food & Wine

Australia’s chefs and winemakers have learnt from the best, and then bent the rules for a food and wine style all of their own. They’ve turned Australia’s sun-kissed produce into a melting pot of cuisine and award-winning wines. Whether you want a fresh seafood platter, a racy Riesling, a modern Asian-fused meal or a crocodile sausage, Australia is the place to be.

Northern Territories: Street Food & Vendors

Welcome to Darwin’s Mindil Beach Sunset Market where you can sample the flavors of the Asia-Pacific in a balmy, tropical setting. The coconut palms are swaying in the sunset, and the smell of sizzling satay and spicy noodles is in the air. Held every Thursday night between May and October, these popular markets offer over 60 food stalls to sate your appetite while the sun goes down.

Melbourne: Yarra Valley Family Owned Vineyards

Just behind Melbourne’s fringes is the Yarra Valley – a place of pristine beauty, crisp clean water and friendly ambience. Clustered behind its rolling hills are 55 wineries, ranging from small family-owned vineyards to the famous Chateau Yering and Domain Chandon. Dine in gourmet restaurants and taste pinot noir, chardonnay and sparkling in a world reminiscent of French and Italian wine growing regions.

Adelaide: Barossa Valley Australia’s Famous Wine Region

Sip wines from more than 60 cellar doors, including Yalumba, Wolf Blass and Peter Lehmann in Australia’s wine capital. In the Barossa you’ll get to meet the people behind the labels and talk to them about their craft. You can also match your favorite wine with locally made cheese on a food and wine trail, tour historic wineries, take a tutored tasting or learn cellar secrets in a wine master class. Of course, nothing beats a long lunch under the gum trees with a bottle of one of the region’s flagship wines, Barossa Shiraz or Eden Valley Riesling.

Tazmania:  Coal River Valley

Enjoy pinot noirs, cabernets and medal-winning chardonnays in the scenic Coal River Valley, just a 10 minute drive from Hobart. Sample superb cool-climate wines at the cellar doors and taste fresh Tasmanian produce in vineyard restaurants. Soak up the water views and stop off at the historic village of Richmond before completing your idyllic day trip.

Sydney: Bondi Beach

Savor spectacular ocean views with your food in Bondi’s many beachside eateries. Enjoy a gelato at the 1920s Bondi Pavilion or watch the sun go down with a cocktail at one of the acclaimed restaurants. At the cafes on Campbell Parade, Hall Street and clustered around Bondi’s back streets, you’ll find everything from tapas to the world’s best brunch to classic fish and chips.

Perth: Food, Wine, Microbrewerie & Leisure

Indulge in divine local produce and award-winning wines in Western Australia’s oldest wine region, just a boat ride from Perth. Take in the vines, waterfalls and lush bush land on a cruise up the Swan River. Then hop off for cellar door tastings, a visit to one of the microbreweries and a vineyard or picnic lunch. The Swan Valley is also great for horse riding, cycling, golf, wildlife watching and heritage walks. Check out the antique shops, pubs and galleries in the historic village of Guildford before you head home.

Queensland: Cairns Fresh Produce and Rainforests

Feast on locally-grown bananas, paw-paws, mangos, pineapples and lychees in the ‘exotic fruit bowl of the world’ near Cairns. But more than fruit flourishes in the region’s rich volcanic soils, green rainforest belt and clean tropical waters. Try seafood, game meats, freshly-made pasta and organic bush foods. Visit an organic permaculture orchard in the rainforest, dine on freshly-caught barramundi in Cairns or sample macadamias and coffee on plantations in the tablelands.

Canberra: Australia’s Capitol

Visit cool climate wineries, country cafes, art galleries and craft studios on this self-drive through the Canberra countryside. This is a region where you can enjoy the fruits of country labour – a table laden with delicious food and a bottle of last year’s vintage. Stay in a bed and breakfast where you sleep in crisp linen sheets and wake to bird song on the verandah. Buy handmade glassware and pottery from the galleries and taste wood smoked meats and homemade wine on a farm.

Free Chicken at KFC & El Pollo Loco!

Ok fellow travelers.  If today you find yourself wandering around a new city with a grumbling stomach and light wallet;  ask around and point yourself to the nearest KFC.   KFC has officially declared today, Monday, April 27 as “Unfry Day” and is offering you some free Kentucky Grilled chicken.  Personally Im a fan of the extra crispy but its hard to complain with gratis poultry.

Fall Foliage: Top Ten Destinations

Now is that time where summer is quickly fading into the horizon and the cool crisp air of fall begins to slowly overcome us and nothing says autumn like the dramatic colors that blaze through the fall trees. So courtesy of ShermansTravel here are the top 10 foliage destination of fall.

Aspen, CO
While Colorado’s aspens don’t offer the vibrant fall color spectacle of say, the Northeast, the yellows, golds, and bold oranges that cover the mountainsides here, against a backdrop of intermittent evergreens, are still reason enough for a visit. Mid- to late-September is the ideal time to catch the show.

Hotels in Aspen

The Catskills, NY
Dubbed “America’s First Wilderness,” this beautiful region harbors a variety of trees – maple, oak, birch, and beech among them – that come into their prime during the last two weeks of September or early to mid-October. Historic towns boast charming B&B’s that make great bases for discovering the family-friendly harvest festivals, farmers’ markets, pick-your-own orchards, crafts fairs, and antique shops that define the region at this time of year.

Hotels in Catskill

Columbia River Gorge, OR
A geological wonder, the gorge itself weaves its way through the Cascade Mountains, forming the border between northern Oregon and southern Washington, and is loaded with lush fir forests and twisted pines, big-leaf maple, cottonwood, Oregon ash, and vine maple trees that show their colors from mid-September to mid-October. The area is also known for its dazzling waterfalls, the remarkable 620-foot Multnomah Falls chief among them.

Hotels in the Columbia River Gorge

Eastern Townships, QC
This section of Quebec stretches as far east as Maine, perhaps explaining why some consider the region to resemble neighboring New England, but with the French influences you’d expect of the province. It is probably no surprise that the maple leaf is the star of the show here, and visitors can enjoy a fiery display on horseback or on foot, particularly from mid- to late-September when the foliage season reaches its peak.

Hotels in Eastern Townships

Great Smoky Mountains, TN & NC
Nestled between North Carolina and Tennessee, the most-visited National Park in the United States is home to 100 species of trees with an awesome display of turning leaves. Peak fall colors are predicted for mid-October through early November; the most memorable foliage coming courtesy of sugar maples, scarlet oaks, sweetgums, red maples, and hickories.

Hotels Near the Great Smokey Mountains Nat’l Park

Litchfield Hills, CT
The Litchfield Hills is a spectacular sight each autumn when the maple, oak, aspen, beech, and birch trees are ablaze with color. You can take in the splendor on one of the many driving itineraries available or see it from the sky on a hot-air-balloon ride. Whatever your pleasure, try to visit in mid-October, when the colors are at their most vivid.

Hotels Near Litchfield

Lost Maples Natural Area, TX
While many think cacti is the main source of green in Texas, the Lone Star State is in fact home to the Lost Maples State Natural Area, which welcomes a beautiful flush come autumn, thanks in no small part to the relatively uncommon uvalde bigtooth maples, whose reddish blush is most spectacular from mid-October through mid-November.

Hotels Near the Lost Maples Natural Area (San Antonio)

Pennsylvania
Move over Madison County, Pennsylvania rules when it comes to covered bridges – the state boasts more then any place in the world. If you’re an admirer, you’re in luck – covered bridges figure heavily on several different driving itineraries worth doing through the Lehigh Valley and Philadelphia countryside. Pine, hemlock, and maple trees dominate, and the colors (think gold and flaming red) reach their peak in early October.

Washington County, ME
For hard-core foliage enthusiasts looking to escape the crowds that plague much of New England each fall, Washington County, in Maine, is paradise for a leaf-peeper seeking solitude. The fall colors range from burnt orange to blazing red to golden yellow on the region’s birch, maple, oak, aspen, and ash trees, and are most vibrant from early to mid-October.